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, and everything, they give big tax breaks for the oil companies. the big manufacturers. they're taking jobs away from us. and why they think it is best to do that. i need an answer to that, because i work 40 years of my life, and now i'm disabled. and now they're talking about cutting everything. i just don't think -- i've even put my life on the line for this country, vietnam. why they think it's the right thing to do. host: thanks for your call. next up, a comment from hewitt, texas. tony, a republican there. good morning. caller: good morning. how's everybody there this morning? host: it's a little hot both temperature-wise and internally i think here. caller: yeah. you know, we deal with a few facts here this morning. that cut, cap and balance that was passed did two things that everybody just is totally bent out of shape about. one of which is that it would raise the debt ceiling, and we would give that community organizer everything he wanted. it also, at the time, would say that the united states would even have a downgrade in its debt rating. and what do we do? well, you got the presiden
. >>> well, the big story today, debt-struction. a lot of political shenanigans, developments coming fast and furious,y might expect this afternoon. widely, the markets are expecting a deal of some findish even if it's a band thade doesn't do much. we'll see what it mean. good afternoon. i'm dylan ratigan. a mass of house votes on yet another revised version of speaker boehner's deal. all of these deal, lick nickels and -- the final vote won't come until later tonight if boehner can whip up the 216 votes to do the deal. couldn't do it yesterday. we start with luke rurt on capitol hill. mike viqueira on standby at the white house. we begin with you, luke. tell me about a tea party politician who ran for the congress in objection to the back room arm twisting where i say i'll take away funding for the bridge, the sochool, the hospital if you don't vote on this? people wouldn't tolerate that and i imagine they're saying i'll withdraw your funding if you don't say yes on this vote? >> the house gop banned earmarks. weren't of the reasons boehner didn't go to the floor. not aa lot to give away
it is that momentous. the flurry of talk last week about going big and swinging for the fences were underscoring the idea of the president and the speaker to persuade the democratic and republican rank- and-file to go for something as big as $4 trillion. it was a long shot to begin with. both sides decided to spend a few days pursuing this long shot and it turns out that speaker behner blinked first. he was the first one to realize publicly that he did not have the votes in his own troops to get this through because it would require too much. host: if the number goes down from $4 trillion, what gets left behind? guest: you go from $4 trillion down to something. the fall back number we think is $2.50 trillion. that is the amount of deficit reduction that would be necessary to get republicans to vote for an equivalent amount of debt ceiling increase. that is what is required to keep the treasury in the flush to get for the next election. that is the number and we know that the vice president had six members of congress and they were pretty close. they were at about $2 trillion. entirely from the s
that she could catch fire. look, when you start this thing, when you win iowa, if you win iowa big, that thing starts rolling through new hampshire and south carolina, it's over in weeks. i agree 100%. >> how was she going in philadelphia suburbs? how is she going to do in the i-4 corridor and in wisconsin? how is she going to do in new mexico, arizona? i would suggest, with swing voters not well at all. >> there's no doubt if you nominate michele bachmann, it's an enormous risk. the only conditions, i think, under which i believe she could win the presidency, if people say, if they did in 1980, i don't care, i'm taking a chance with this guy because what we got we can't stand, you get 9% or 10% unemployment, two more years, this country is ready for a lot of change. more "morning joe" in a moment. with the hotels.com 48-hour sale, the possibilities are endless. interesting... save up to 50% this tuesday and wednesday only. hotels.com. be smart. book smart.  finally, there's a choice for my patients with an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, or afib, that's not cause
. how exciting. >> they match. >> they do match. >> the big news of the day, yesterday, of course, was moody's coming out and saying, listen, we don't expect this to happ happen. the chances are slight this is going to happen. just the chance it may happen, we are going to downgrade america's credit rating. >> we are going to put it on credit watch to downgrade it or we will downgrade it if it happens. first of all, the rating agencies were behind the curve during the whole financial crisis and they took a lot of heat for that. now they are trying to be more proactive. when you have a congress that refuses to address the issue, what do they do? it's not a shocker. it's another symbol of how dysfunctional things are in washington and what the stakes are and how dangerous it is. you know a few people across the globe. >> i like it when mika says it better. >> say international financeer. >> i would think these are trying times for banks across the world. look at ireland a second time. it's spread to italy. we have all heard -- greece, portugal. it's all across europe. it's coming to
.i. joe," the lakers and the celtics in the championship. apple wuss big, then it -- was big, then it went away for a while, then it was back again. so it should be obvious that the 1980s is back, and for various reasons i argue in the book, it is back. and i don't think it's just because of the nostalgia factor although that's certainly a factor. also there's some coincidences. i had mentioned on my radio show a couple days ago that the weird coincidence, although you may see it not just as a coincidence, that 25 years ago almost to the exact week and, certainly, to the exact month the united states military was bombing libya, and the world was wrapped with the detention about a nuclear meltdown at chernobyl. those two things happened almost exactly 25 years ago to the month. so as much of this is pop culture, some of it is very, very real. and what i argue in the book is that the popular culture of the 1980s, the iconography of the 1980s in many ways has inspired the way we hook at real world -- look at real world events and how real world, i guess you would call them actors, behave toda
. it would have three big teaches and, again, the details of these -- it would have three big features, and again the details would be outlays need to equal revenues. that is the fundamental definition of a balance. you don't run deficits. you make sure that you spend no more than you take n the sieged thing that some of us feel strongly about and i'm one of them, we ought to limit spending as a percentage of our economy so that the government doesn't keep growing at the expense of the private sector, which is exactly what happens when the government occupies too large a segment of our economy. and finally, we've advocated that we not create a mechanism that simply guarantees big tax increases in order to balance the budget and to do that we would like -- and we have included a supermajority requirement to raise taxes. so that a simple majority wouldn't be enough. it would require a supermajority, which would only occur presumably in truly extraordinary circumstances. see, i believe very strongly that we can have strong economic growth and the job creation that we need. but to get ther
. >> whether you get the big or not, you know this won't pass the senate. >> i don't know if it will or won't. >> do you believe we should raise the ceiling? yes or no. >> if the senate is responsibility, then cut, cap and balance will pass. >> let me ask you a question -- do you agree with the president that we need to raise the ceiling, president obama? >> i will vote to raise the debt ceiling if we address the long-term issue of federal insolvency caused by -- if we do not address the long-term issue, the risk associated with piling on higher and higher debt loads, if we don't address that, then, no, sir, i will not vote for the debt ceiling. >> ronald railinger, who was someone i'm sure you admire, let me show you what he said about the dead ceiling, maybe you should tell your colleagues this. >> i'm familiar with this quote. >> congress consistently brings the government to the edge of default before facing its responsibility. this brinksmanship threatens the holders of government bonds, those who rely on associate security and vet ran benefits. the united states has a special responsi
for freed african-americans who were living in the washington area. and they would make a big effort to impress lincoln. they would dress in their finest clothes. the men often wearing civil war uniforms both the gray and the blue they had gotten from battlefields and they would line up and sing spirituals and entertain him with these spirituals and he was so moved to tears often that a lot of the people often thought that this deepened his commitment to abolition and to emancipation. just being in the presence of the african-americans who had been slaves and talking to them but especially what became sort of quasi religious ceremonies that he was the center of. and he was, of course, sort of a semi religious figure among many freed slaves in those days. >> host: what strikes me when you go through all the presidents and, of course, you mentioned them all is isolation. you have a lincoln and you have an andrew johnson who were pretty much indifferent. to the flight of people of african descent. >> guest: yes. >> host: pretty -- the other is a class-based oscillation because you had p
in transforming themselves, she's one of the big reasons why. please help me in welcoming to the stage, liz schuller. [applause] >> thank you. all right. thank you, barry, for the introduction. and i'd like to think raj for raising the bar. thanks a lot for the rest of us and not those creative messaging tools that we all need to address inequality. i wish i would have heard her before my speech. so why am i here as part of this panel? the whole point of what i want to talk to you today is the power of collective action and how it could counter the rise in inequality and how unions fit into that picture. now, when i think about inequality, especially, as of late, i think about those teachers in wisconsin, construction workers in ohio, nurses in new hampshire, who have been locked out and denied their basic rights to collective bargaining. we've seen what it looks like the state capital in wisconsin and we show you now what's happening in office buildings all across this country. ♪ >> here's to america's workers. when the economy was down, they sacrificed. during tough times when executive
african-americans who were living in the washington area. and they would make a big effort to impress lincoln. they could dress in their finest close. men wearing civil war, both the gray and the blue they got for battle fields. they'd line up and sing spirituals and entertainment with these spirituals. and he was so moved to tearing often that a lot of people around him thought this sort of deepened his commitment to abolition and to emancipation. just being in the presence of the african-americans had somebody slaves and talking to them. especially what became quasi religious ceremonies. he was sort of semireligious figure among freed slaves in those days. >> host: what strikes me when you go through all of the presidents and you mention them all is oscillation. you've got -- you have a lincoln and an andrew johnson. who was pretty much indifferent. he was to the plight of people of african-american descent. >> guest: yeah. the other oscillation is a class-based oscillation. you had people in the white house that served several. they could observe how people behaved towards people.
're now at the president's big deal target, which we're not going to meet under the gang of six or any of the other constructs around here, cancel the social security tax holiday, borrow the money one more year, invest it in infrastructure, put millions to work, when those millions go to work, they'll be paying taxes, that'll reduce the deficit by about another quarter. we solved 3/4 of the problem without killing programs essential to the american people and without cutting taxes on the job creators. the gang of six is proposing that billionaires should see their taxes cut by about 25% or 30% that will help us balance the budget. time to get back to the real world and out of "alice in wonderland." the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. thompson, for five minutes. mr. tompson: thank you, mr. speaker. since 1947, every august, the little league baseball world series is held in pennsylvania within pennsylvania's fifth congressional district. each year, little league international recognizes little league gradua
supporting the money people. all those are the owners of the big corporation and moving away from this country and taken to places where they don't pay no taxes. they pay lower salary. nothing for the working people. they take their jobs and put the food on the table of the other country. we have to stop that. we have to stop that. we have to get rid of that bunch of bandits out there. host: all right. we've got the point. remind our viewers coming up grover norquist will be here followed by the chairman of the congressional caucus. representative whip announced wednesday, he'll marshal democratic votes. >> how do you think the presidents are handling the debt talks? caller: i think they are handling it well for the most part. they are not willing to throw the middle class under the bus. right after this conversation you'll have grover norquist. they don't want to negotiate. how do you just default on the country. i don't understand the average american people standing up for them. all they are working for is corporation. i will never understand how so many of them got in. you ca
forward to reduce the deficit in a big way modeled after these bipartisan commissions, where there's been pretty good bipartisan agreeme agreement. but efforts to forge a grand compromise, bringing the deficit down by $4 trillion, have been abandoned by republican leaders over and over. i -- i have not supported every detail in these grand compromise efforts. i don't want to do anything to undermine medicare or social security or medicaid, programs that have worked for generations now and programs that millions of ohioans depend on, for middletown to ashtaboula to toledo and gallipolis. that's because i wanted a more balanced approach. i know the presiding officer did too. but as days and weeks and weeks and months go by, we're now only days away from default. we're simply running out of time. that's what the senate bill is about, protecting us from default. the spirit of continued compromise again, the majority leader has come forth with a plan to reduce the deficit by $2.2 trillion. it's truly a compromise because it meets the republicans' main criteria, it contains spending cuts to rou
. there was a big issue at the end of the last congress that threatened a meltdown over whether or not we were going to extend the package of tax cuts. then we have the cr, threatening to shut down of the government. now we are having a high-stakes game of chicken that could have significant implications for the global economy as well as devastation for what we face to going forward. and then you know what? we will be right back with that with the budget, not once but twice, before the election. most in the house want to see something that is more sustainable and allows us to get back to the business of helping all americans get back to work, rebuilding the country, and dealing with long-term solutions rather than short-term fixes to deal with theoretical issues with the budget. host: to be clear, if the reid proposal could come before the house, would you vote for it? guest: i have not seen it. i had a dinner with a friend of mine in the senate last night who says that they are interested in the details. they have not seen the details yet. i am not going to commit to something that no one i know ha
aliens across the gulfstream from cuba into key west also a big part of the scene then and then cuba itself was locked in revolution. there was a right wing military dictator in power and there was a growing revolt and a lot of revolutionary activity and gun running. really an exciting time to be here in key west. he loved the fishing. he loved hispanic culture. he loved the real people here and the kind of hard-boiled life that they led dealing with these two cultures. in a transitional periods. >> each one of these programs was focusing on a particular work of this writer and we're dealing with the sun also rises in the modern library list of books at the end of the 20th. this was number 45 of the most influential novels of the century. for him which book was it? >> for hemingway it was his first novel. his very first book was a collection of short stories called in our time, which absolutely a groundbreaking book. one of the things we need to remember in hemingway, in a sense he really created literary modernism and brought it into the mainstream and clear prose that completely ov
. russell berman, welcome to the "washington journal." you have the headline here, boehner, a big deal no longer operative. he told house republicans on tuesday -- between what speaker boehner is saying and what minority leader mitch mcconnell is saying, where are the negotiations at this point? guest: the prevailing milled -- mood is pessimism. the negotiations now that the congressional leaders have gone to the white house for three straight days, the of not made a whole lot of progress. each side has retrenched. ideologically, the democrats are leery of making any cuts or changes to entitlement programs without some revenue increases, tax increases. and republicans have been consistently opposed to anything that smacks of tax increases. so you had the mcconnell plan yesterday shaking everything up a bit. it is unclear how viable an option that will be going forward. host: when they get together with the president at the white house this afternoon, what is it that will be on the table? what will they be able to work with on the congressional side and on obama's side? guest: been talk
senate procedure, the regular order but have attempted to solve this big problem in secret, behind closed doors with just a few people. i believe that is contrary to the historical understanding of the role of congress and i'm not happy about it, i oppose it a i object to it and i expect an appropriate amount of time to consider whatever plan comes ded women like them guard these hallowed halls. mr. president, some of those dedicated police officers stood guard saturday and sunday as we worked to reach an agreement to avert a default on our national debt. leaders from both parties were here throughout the weekend. differences still separate our two sides but work toward an agreement continues. this afternoon, i will put on the floor a proposal to -- that i hope will break that impasse. this legislation would put to rest the specter of default. it would cut $2.7 trillion from the deficit over the next decade. it would not raise any new revenue or make any cuts to medicare, medicaid or social security. all the cuts included in this package have previously been supported by republicans. the
on it but i do know that it was in an effort to try to make sure that the rates that the two big providers in mississippi, and, of course, energy was heavily invested in louisiana as well. but i don't know the details on that but i do know. >> mr. mack so, have you had any experience with this kind of think? >> we have not. >> mr. serino, i'm going to the i am going to continue on this. chairman, i would love to talk to you about it and senator mccaskill and i have been talking about it. you know, if this community would've happened to have a municipal provider, let's say they paid 10% under the stafford act of the repair costs, they would be passing along to .5 million to the ratepayers instead of 25 million. court if they have a 75, 25 sure, they'll be passing along 6.2 the ratepayers instead of 25 million. those rate players pay federal taxes in exactly the same way that the neighboring community of carthage that has a municipal utility pays federal taxes. we have more experience with this with devastating i storms. we have miles and miles of polls broken off, and the mileage that is in
tax cuts in 2001 and 2003 to the wealthy and big corporations, the so-called job creators, didn't create jobs in the private sector. indeed, only one million net new jobs were created between 2001 and 2009. all government jobs. the private sector reported minus 600,000 jobs. so much for giving tax breaks to the private job generators. some argue against all debt, but all debts aren't bad because all debts are not the same. a $50,000 gambling debt is bad because it has no return. the last decade shows that gambling on tax cuts for the rich to create jobs was bad. gambling on two wars and not paying for them was bad. gambling on a new prescription drug law that was unpaid for was horrible. and gambling on unregulated financial institutions that failed was bad. and they resulted in a housing market collapse, slow economic growth, high unemployment and huge deficits and debts, all bad. so i think we gambled enough on the theory that budget cuts and tax cuts generate private sector jobs and more taxes. the l-a-f-f-e-r is truly a laffer. republicans are right, we do have speaning prob
. the caller's point about big business, which over -- overwhelmingly supported obama in the last election, there was a letter in "the new york times" this morning from business interests, a broad variety, many center-right conservative business interests, beseeching every member of congress, what ever you do, raise the debt ceiling. business is in favor of raising the debt ceiling. the only people that i know that are not in favor of raising the debt ceiling are serious principle conservatives. i am not saying they are right, but as a factual matter all the people who actually control the country are agreed on that one question, we must raise the debt ceiling. host: we are coming to you from the arlington campus. students from 35 different states. high school seniors. studying the media. please go ahead. >> what do you believe will happen when it comes to the debt ceiling debate them of what influence will lead abdon world economic powers? guest: i have a singularly bad track record of predicting events before they happen. i thought hillary clinton would be the democratic nominee, etc., e
parents to protect entitlements for big oil companies, billionaire corporate executives who travel the world in private jets and millionaires who believe they are entitled to all of the tax loopholes they're getting now after the biggest tax cut in history, entitled to tax cuts but not obligated to create american jobs. contrary to the false rhetoric we hear from the other side about a correlation between entitlements for the wealthy and job creation. the hard right wing of the republican party has come to the table willing to give up nothing, unwilling to accept an offer by the president and democrats of trillions of dollars in spending cuts, potential savings in entitlement programs and tax reform options, all of which they have been demanding, unless we agree to protect to the entitlements that exist for the wealthy. not even a single penny on the revenue side of the option. don't touch those entitlements for the big five oil companies. don't touch the entitlements for the corporate jets. don't touch the entitlements for the racehorses. don't touch any of those entitlements give
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)